Top 5 things I do with my Ubuntu Linux

I haven’t had much time since I migrated my blog to a new VPS server. However, here is a little treat for all my readers out there. The top 5 things I do with my Ubuntu Linux:

  1. Surfing the internet
    Pretty obvious – I usually surf the internet using my Ubuntu Linux on my Desktop computer. I’ve a dual-monitor setup computer with Intel Core i5 CPU (12GB RAM), It is not a gaming pc, but I do occasionally play DOSBox games as well as Need For Speed: World from another operating system. The seamless Unity integration with the web intrigues me though, wished I had touchscreen monitor
  2. Developing Android Application
    The qemu-based Android device emulator runs nicely on Ubuntu, with no sign of lagging presents in other operating systems. Plus with 12GB of RAM, I can say that I could study and do mobile application with relative comfort. For Android 4.x development, I prefer to use the x86 images, because put less contraint on the CPU for skipping ARM-related code translation.
  3. Torrents
    Usually this is being done in parallel with other works. My current favorite bittorent client is Deluge. For some reason, I find Azureus/Vuze too cumbersome and I haven’t got around to use Transmission. I used to study bittorrent protocol in my spare time, but has since abandoned it when I realise that I’ve not much time to spend on side-projects anymore.
  4. Writing Manual
    I’m now in the process of writing a Lab Manual for those who just begining to learn about Mobile Computing. Although I wouldn’t call myself as an expert, I think every little bit of knowledge-sharing helps. I’ll promise I’ll share my progress with all of you sometimes at the end of the year. Though, I usually prepare my academic papers using Latex (IEEE templates), I choose to write my manual in LibreOffice, for reasons that I’m more familiar with WYSIWYG word-processor, plus, the publisher would prefer to receive the written manuscript in OpenDocument or Microsoft OpenXML file.
  5. Internet Radio
    Though I rarely if ever listen to MP3 in portable devices, I do listen to internet radio station from Rhythmbox. There are sizeable collection of preset Internet Radio station in Rhythmbox according to genre and age-group. I prefer to listen to trance or easy-listening radio stations.

There you go, the top 5 things that I usually do with my Ubuntu Linux. Nothing fancy, just that I prefer to use Ubuntu for reasons of application development. I’m a terminal-emulator typed guy. I prefer to switch/change the environmental settings using terminal emulator, something I find very easy to do in Ubuntu (or any GNU/Linux distribution for that matter).

Until next time…

Book Giveaway: Linux Module Programming Guide

Free !

Listen up!

UbuntuGeek is giving away the “Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide” e-book for free! The book contains guides and tutorial on how to write loadable Linux kernel module and drivers.

According to its official description:

“An excellent guide for anyone wishing to get started on kernel module programming. The author takes a hands-on approach starting with writing a small “hello, world” program, and quickly moves from there. Far from a boring text on programming, Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide has a lively style that entertains while it educates”

Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide

Download now: Linux Kernel Module Programming Guide (PDF)

Ubuntu Mobile Edition running on Sony Ericsson P990i?

While Ubuntu Mobile and Embedded Edition isn’t quite ready yet, seems to me somebody tries to get creative by posting this video on Youtube.

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Ubuntu on Sony Ericsson P990i
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Meanwhile, here’s the correct video that shows the current progress of Ubuntu Mobile and Embedded Edition UI.
Continue reading “Ubuntu Mobile Edition running on Sony Ericsson P990i?”

How to use SVN for beginners

surface from Linux by Examples has written two ‘getting started for SVN’ articles that I find it interesting and useful for beginners.

The article covers important SVN operation (checkout,diff,update,import, check in) necessary for managing a software project.

Here’s the link to the article :

What is SVN (Subversion)
SVN or subversion is an open source tool used for revision control system similar to CVS. It is widely use by popular open source project such as Apache, KDE, Gnome, Python and Samba as their version control program.

Open Source repository site like SourceForge and Google Code Project Hosting provides SVN hosting for free and open source project.

Further Reading
You can find more information about SVN (or Subversion) and maintaining open source software by reading these books:

Visit SVN (Subversion) Official website for more information about the system.

Recommended Reading