Canonical reduces support length for Non-LTS Ubuntu releases

Canonical has decided on reduces the official support for non-LTS Ubuntu releases to NINE(9) months starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 13.04 release

As for my personal opinion, this changes is long overdue since 18 month support time for a SIX(6)-month cycle release can be considered as long, thus it is better to invest those precious time and effort into producing newer Ubuntu release.

These changes has been voted with presence of Ubuntu Technical Board and will be effective starting with Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail onwards.

Google Nexus 7 running on Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail

Here is the video showing Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail (still in development at this time of writing) running on Nexus 7, a 7.81″ tablet which runs Android Jelly Bean by default.

It is expected that more announcement will be made regarding Ubuntu tablet at the upcoming Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Denmark, which Mark Shuttleworth himself drop a hint that future Ubuntu development will focused on mobile platform. He even encouraged attendees to bring Nexus 7 to the summit.

My Thoughts
Its refreshing to see Ubuntu can be ported on tablets. It open up several opportunities to integrate Ubuntu operating system with mobile platform and together with the possibility of cloud computing, it will be able to unify the way people use their computers in their daily life. However, a new GUI has to be designed in order to make Ubuntu usable and convenient to be used on tablets.

All in all, it is a bold move from Canonical.

How to install Unity 6.x backports to Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise)

Unity 6.x (included by default in Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal) features performance improvements and new features on the Unity 3D user-interface as several bug fixes which enhances user experience while using Ubuntu desktop. Besides that, the backport also improve the performance of low-end 3d cards when rendering unity animations.

ubuntu logo 12.10 Quantal

Use these command to install Unity 6.x backports into Ubuntu 12.04 LTS:
[bash]
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:benkai/precise-unity-backport
sudo apt-get update
sudo aptitude remove unity-lens-applications
sudo aptitude install unity
wget http://ppa.launchpad.net/benkai/precise-unity-backport/ubuntu/pool/main/u/unity-lens-applications/unity-lens-applications_6.4.0-0ubuntu2_amd64.deb or
wget http://ppa.launchpad.net/benkai/precise-unity-backport/ubuntu/pool/main/u/unity-lens-applications/unity-lens-applications_6.4.0-0ubuntu2_i386.deb
sudo dpkg -i unity-lens-applications_6.4.0-0ubuntu2_*.deb
[/bash]

Note:
The unity backport may cause stability issues with Nouveau (nVidia Accelerated Open Source video driver). Those who are using nVidia cards are advised to use nVidia blob binary drivers.

Ubuntu 12.10 Performance Comparison : 64-bit vs 32-bit

It has been known that the X86 64bit architecture outperform 32bit architecture. However, little is known whether 64-bit Ubuntu installation outperforms its 32-bit counterpart significantly as the latter is marked as recommended download from Ubuntu website.

Luckily [Phoronix] had answered these questions for us. In its latest article, [Phoronix] compares the performance between 64-bit Ubuntu installation and 32-bit Ubuntu installation on a Intel Core i5 2520 (4 cores) with 4GB RAM.

Audio File Encoding Performance (less is better)

Server Workload Performance (more is better)

The result concludes that Ubuntu 12.10 64-bit performs better on overall compared to 32-bit, especially on video/audio encoding/decoding tasks. Ubuntu 12.10 also performs better with server workloads.

My thoughts:
Although Canonical still marks Ubuntu 12.10 32-bit as the recommended download. It seems that 64-bit installation offers greater performance even without the advantage of having greater memory. Some might argue that PAE still allows 32-bit Ubuntu to access more than 4GB RAM, PAE access on 32-bit is still significantly slower when compared to 64-bit memory access. Personally, I use Ubuntu 64bit for my development machine as all of my hardware has opensource drivers.

How to remove Amazon Shopping search result from Unity

Hi there, Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal is out! However the Dash search functionality includes shopping results retrieved from the internet (namely Amazon), which I personally found annoying.

ubuntu

In order to remove that, just run this command:

[bash]
sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-shopping
[/bash]

This will remove online shopping search suggestions. Your mile may vary, but from my point of view, it does speed-up search result.

Try it!

Compact Grub and Remote Login menu: New features that I love in Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal

Those who are keeping up with the updates knows that Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal has been released yesterday!

However now I’m going to share two great features that I like about Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal.

#1. New GRUB menu that hides old kernel after updates!

Now, GRUB menu always display “Ubuntu” with each kernel update. All previous kernels are grouped together under the “Advanced options for Ubuntu”.

So you get:

Instead of:

This will keep the computer from listing too many kernels on the boot menu, which is messy in itself.

#2. Remote Login option!

Ubuntu Quantal Quetzal allows users to login remotely to Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) server right from Ubuntu Greeter.

Other Features worth mentioning

  • Linux kernel 3.5
  • LibreOffice 3.6.1.2, featuring menu that can be integrated to Unity menu.

My new Android app development machine – running on Ubuntu Precise

I always wanted a smooth development machine which can run multiple virtual machine (VM) at once, which is a must when testing app that is meant to be portable across different platform. So just before Ramadhan (in July), I bought 8GB RAM and 1TB hdd from a local pc shop and proceed to set-up my development machine.

The machine already has 4GB ram so adding the extra RAM bumped it to 12GB. The machine I was running is an older Intel Core i5, which is decent enough to execute all the VM that is necessarily when developing and testing the app.

 

with all those RAM, seems it’ll be quite a while before I use the swap space again.