Top 5 things I do with my Ubuntu Linux

I haven’t had much time since I migrated my blog to a new VPS server. However, here is a little treat for all my readers out there. The top 5 things I do with my Ubuntu Linux:

  1. Surfing the internet
    Pretty obvious – I usually surf the internet using my Ubuntu Linux on my Desktop computer. I’ve a dual-monitor setup computer with Intel Core i5 CPU (12GB RAM), It is not a gaming pc, but I do occasionally play DOSBox games as well as Need For Speed: World from another operating system. The seamless Unity integration with the web intrigues me though, wished I had touchscreen monitor
  2. Developing Android Application
    The qemu-based Android device emulator runs nicely on Ubuntu, with no sign of lagging presents in other operating systems. Plus with 12GB of RAM, I can say that I could study and do mobile application with relative comfort. For Android 4.x development, I prefer to use the x86 images, because put less contraint on the CPU for skipping ARM-related code translation.
  3. Torrents
    Usually this is being done in parallel with other works. My current favorite bittorent client is Deluge. For some reason, I find Azureus/Vuze too cumbersome and I haven’t got around to use Transmission. I used to study bittorrent protocol in my spare time, but has since abandoned it when I realise that I’ve not much time to spend on side-projects anymore.
  4. Writing Manual
    I’m now in the process of writing a Lab Manual for those who just begining to learn about Mobile Computing. Although I wouldn’t call myself as an expert, I think every little bit of knowledge-sharing helps. I’ll promise I’ll share my progress with all of you sometimes at the end of the year. Though, I usually prepare my academic papers using Latex (IEEE templates), I choose to write my manual in LibreOffice, for reasons that I’m more familiar with WYSIWYG word-processor, plus, the publisher would prefer to receive the written manuscript in OpenDocument or Microsoft OpenXML file.
  5. Internet Radio
    Though I rarely if ever listen to MP3 in portable devices, I do listen to internet radio station from Rhythmbox. There are sizeable collection of preset Internet Radio station in Rhythmbox according to genre and age-group. I prefer to listen to trance or easy-listening radio stations.

There you go, the top 5 things that I usually do with my Ubuntu Linux. Nothing fancy, just that I prefer to use Ubuntu for reasons of application development. I’m a terminal-emulator typed guy. I prefer to switch/change the environmental settings using terminal emulator, something I find very easy to do in Ubuntu (or any GNU/Linux distribution for that matter).

Until next time…

Google Nexus 7 running on Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail

Here is the video showing Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail (still in development at this time of writing) running on Nexus 7, a 7.81″ tablet which runs Android Jelly Bean by default.

It is expected that more announcement will be made regarding Ubuntu tablet at the upcoming Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Denmark, which Mark Shuttleworth himself drop a hint that future Ubuntu development will focused on mobile platform. He even encouraged attendees to bring Nexus 7 to the summit.

My Thoughts
Its refreshing to see Ubuntu can be ported on tablets. It open up several opportunities to integrate Ubuntu operating system with mobile platform and together with the possibility of cloud computing, it will be able to unify the way people use their computers in their daily life. However, a new GUI has to be designed in order to make Ubuntu usable and convenient to be used on tablets.

All in all, it is a bold move from Canonical.

How to remove Amazon Shopping search result from Unity

Hi there, Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal is out! However the Dash search functionality includes shopping results retrieved from the internet (namely Amazon), which I personally found annoying.

ubuntu

In order to remove that, just run this command:

[bash]
sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-shopping
[/bash]

This will remove online shopping search suggestions. Your mile may vary, but from my point of view, it does speed-up search result.

Try it!

Compact Grub and Remote Login menu: New features that I love in Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal

Those who are keeping up with the updates knows that Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal has been released yesterday!

However now I’m going to share two great features that I like about Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal.

#1. New GRUB menu that hides old kernel after updates!

Now, GRUB menu always display “Ubuntu” with each kernel update. All previous kernels are grouped together under the “Advanced options for Ubuntu”.

So you get:

Instead of:

This will keep the computer from listing too many kernels on the boot menu, which is messy in itself.

#2. Remote Login option!

Ubuntu Quantal Quetzal allows users to login remotely to Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) server right from Ubuntu Greeter.

Other Features worth mentioning

  • Linux kernel 3.5
  • LibreOffice 3.6.1.2, featuring menu that can be integrated to Unity menu.

How to convert between sqlite2 and sqlite3 database

Here’s a short guide on how to convert between sqlite2 to sqlite3 database file:

[bash]
sqlite2 /path/to/mysqlite2.db .dump > backupfile
sqlite3 /path/to/mynewsqlite3.db < backupfile
[/bash]

Using the same method, you can convert sqlite3 db to sqlite2 db too!

p/s: Why you need to convert? because embedded device (read: iPhone and Android) only supports sqlite3 database, while PHP 5 by default supports sqlite2 database.

Thus, this method provide a convenient way to convert between the two different version of sqlite db format.