Ubuntu One cloud storage discontinued

Read this: The once-hyped Ubuntu One cloud storage service has been discontinued. Canonical through its Ubuntu One website has stated that Ubuntu One file services will be shut down permanently effective 1 June 2014.

ubuntuone

Users are being given time until 31st July 2014 to download and backup files from Ubuntu One before they will be permanently deleted. Additionally, the service shutdown will also affect Ubuntu One content and music store.

However, according to Canonical Blog, the shutdown will not affect Ubuntu One Single Sign On service, Ubuntu payment service or the U1DB database service.

My thoughts:
Personally, as I suspected early on – Ubuntu One is unable to compete with other Cloud storage competitors and thus decided to focus their efforts on other projects such as Ubuntu Phone project.

Additionally, I also won’t hold my breath on the Ubuntu Phone project as I find it quite hard for Canonical to find manufacturers that will carry Ubuntu OS on their phone. In my opinion, Ubuntu Phone depends too much on Android backend/platform which may risk legal entanglement in the future, or platform incompatibility should there are significant changes in Android platform in the future.

Top 5 things I do with my Ubuntu Linux

I haven’t had much time since I migrated my blog to a new VPS server. However, here is a little treat for all my readers out there. The top 5 things I do with my Ubuntu Linux:

  1. Surfing the internet
    Pretty obvious – I usually surf the internet using my Ubuntu Linux on my Desktop computer. I’ve a dual-monitor setup computer with Intel Core i5 CPU (12GB RAM), It is not a gaming pc, but I do occasionally play DOSBox games as well as Need For Speed: World from another operating system. The seamless Unity integration with the web intrigues me though, wished I had touchscreen monitor
  2. Developing Android Application
    The qemu-based Android device emulator runs nicely on Ubuntu, with no sign of lagging presents in other operating systems. Plus with 12GB of RAM, I can say that I could study and do mobile application with relative comfort. For Android 4.x development, I prefer to use the x86 images, because put less contraint on the CPU for skipping ARM-related code translation.
  3. Torrents
    Usually this is being done in parallel with other works. My current favorite bittorent client is Deluge. For some reason, I find Azureus/Vuze too cumbersome and I haven’t got around to use Transmission. I used to study bittorrent protocol in my spare time, but has since abandoned it when I realise that I’ve not much time to spend on side-projects anymore.
  4. Writing Manual
    I’m now in the process of writing a Lab Manual for those who just begining to learn about Mobile Computing. Although I wouldn’t call myself as an expert, I think every little bit of knowledge-sharing helps. I’ll promise I’ll share my progress with all of you sometimes at the end of the year. Though, I usually prepare my academic papers using Latex (IEEE templates), I choose to write my manual in LibreOffice, for reasons that I’m more familiar with WYSIWYG word-processor, plus, the publisher would prefer to receive the written manuscript in OpenDocument or Microsoft OpenXML file.
  5. Internet Radio
    Though I rarely if ever listen to MP3 in portable devices, I do listen to internet radio station from Rhythmbox. There are sizeable collection of preset Internet Radio station in Rhythmbox according to genre and age-group. I prefer to listen to trance or easy-listening radio stations.

There you go, the top 5 things that I usually do with my Ubuntu Linux. Nothing fancy, just that I prefer to use Ubuntu for reasons of application development. I’m a terminal-emulator typed guy. I prefer to switch/change the environmental settings using terminal emulator, something I find very easy to do in Ubuntu (or any GNU/Linux distribution for that matter).

Until next time…

No Official pre-press Ubuntu 13.04 CD/DVD will be distributed by Canonical

Previously as an effort to promote Ubuntu and Free Software, Canonical has made pre-pressed CD/DVD available for LoCo team to be distributed during release party or promo events.

But starting from Ubuntu 13.04 (Raring Ringtail), pre-pressed Ubuntu CD/DVD will only be made available only for LTS release (the next one will be 14.04 LTS ) from this point forward. This is in-line with Canonical policy to only concentrate on supporting Ubuntu LTS.

In the mean time, Canonical will continue to provide pre-pressed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS CD/DVD to Ubuntu LoCo until 14.04 LTS release in 2014.

source: Ubuntu Loco Council

Why I’m have not become an Ubuntu Member

By this time, I’ve already received dozens of question regarding why I’ve not applied to be an Ubuntu Member.

First and foremost, being an Ubuntu Member is cool. It is about being part of the greater Ubuntu Community officially. Being an Ubuntu members grants certain privileges such as [email protected] email address and the privilege of having personal blog featured in the Ubuntu Planet.

However, I still have not applied or planned to apply to become an Ubuntu Member anytime soon, as I felt that being an Ubuntu Member carries great weight and responsibility towards the community, something that I felt in my current state would be difficult to do, since I hardly have extra spare time nowadays (so does the hiatus).

Secondly, as the Ubuntu Membership page have cleared out, Membership is not required for contribution, but contribution is required for membership. While I did contribute towards the Ubuntu community, I still thinks that Ubuntu community comes second place than my day-to-day responsibilities. I still felt that I couldn’t do much to deserves being an Ubuntu Member, therefore I elect to be an ordinary user who occasionally contributes back to the Free Software community.

Finally, all of you should note that this is my personal opinion and I still think being an Ubuntu Member is a good thing, I even encourage you to apply for it! However, as for me, I’m still going to hold off my thoughts of becoming one until I can find a valid reason to do so.

Cheers!

Canonical reduces support length for Non-LTS Ubuntu releases

Canonical has decided on reduces the official support for non-LTS Ubuntu releases to NINE(9) months starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 13.04 release

As for my personal opinion, this changes is long overdue since 18 month support time for a SIX(6)-month cycle release can be considered as long, thus it is better to invest those precious time and effort into producing newer Ubuntu release.

These changes has been voted with presence of Ubuntu Technical Board and will be effective starting with Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail onwards.

Google Nexus 7 running on Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail

Here is the video showing Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail (still in development at this time of writing) running on Nexus 7, a 7.81″ tablet which runs Android Jelly Bean by default.

It is expected that more announcement will be made regarding Ubuntu tablet at the upcoming Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Denmark, which Mark Shuttleworth himself drop a hint that future Ubuntu development will focused on mobile platform. He even encouraged attendees to bring Nexus 7 to the summit.

My Thoughts
Its refreshing to see Ubuntu can be ported on tablets. It open up several opportunities to integrate Ubuntu operating system with mobile platform and together with the possibility of cloud computing, it will be able to unify the way people use their computers in their daily life. However, a new GUI has to be designed in order to make Ubuntu usable and convenient to be used on tablets.

All in all, it is a bold move from Canonical.

How to install Unity 6.x backports to Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise)

Unity 6.x (included by default in Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal) features performance improvements and new features on the Unity 3D user-interface as several bug fixes which enhances user experience while using Ubuntu desktop. Besides that, the backport also improve the performance of low-end 3d cards when rendering unity animations.

ubuntu logo 12.10 Quantal

Use these command to install Unity 6.x backports into Ubuntu 12.04 LTS:
[bash]
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:benkai/precise-unity-backport
sudo apt-get update
sudo aptitude remove unity-lens-applications
sudo aptitude install unity
wget http://ppa.launchpad.net/benkai/precise-unity-backport/ubuntu/pool/main/u/unity-lens-applications/unity-lens-applications_6.4.0-0ubuntu2_amd64.deb or
wget http://ppa.launchpad.net/benkai/precise-unity-backport/ubuntu/pool/main/u/unity-lens-applications/unity-lens-applications_6.4.0-0ubuntu2_i386.deb
sudo dpkg -i unity-lens-applications_6.4.0-0ubuntu2_*.deb
[/bash]

Note:
The unity backport may cause stability issues with Nouveau (nVidia Accelerated Open Source video driver). Those who are using nVidia cards are advised to use nVidia blob binary drivers.